Photogram exhibit at Yume Japanese Gardens starts on January 27, to March 30, 2022

“Yume Japanese Gardens of Tucson presents an exhibition by acclaimed Artist, Kate Breakey, in the gallery from January 27th through March 30th. 

Photograms, or ‘photogenic drawings’, are the earliest form of photography, a process invented by Henry Fox Talbot. The images are made without a camera; subjects are simply placed on light sensitive paper and exposed to light resulting in a negative shadow with variation in tone according to the transparency of the object. Specimens used in this process include beautiful natural living organisms such as plants, insects, and animals. Their ghostly imprint, a permanent record of their brief existence on this earth. These are part of Breakey’s larger series ‘Las Sombras/The Shadows’ spanning 10 years, in which time she recorded hundreds of plants and creatures as part of her ongoing fascination with the natural world. 

Also in this exhibition are ‘Orotones’ – photographs printed on the back of glass and gilded with hand-applied gold-leaf. Breakey was inspired by this early 20th century photographic process popularized by among others, American photographer, Edward Curtis. However a similar process, ‘Maki-e’ (gold lacquer) Photography had been invented earlier in the late 19th century by Hanbeh Mizuno in Japan.  

Artwork courtesy of the artist and Etherton Gallery. 

The Exhibit is free with regular Gardens admission. “

For more information, visit yumegardens.org or email Patricia Deridder at yume.gardens@gmail.com.

Yume sets capacity limits to safeguard visitors and staff and observes Arizona Department of Health Services guidelines for COVID-19 management. Timed admission tickets, purchased online, are required for entry; physical distancing and facial coverings are also required, in all indoor and outdoor spaces. “

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Yume Japanese Gardens and Museum of Tucson (www.yumegardens.org) is a non-profit 501 (c)(3) organization, located at 2130 N. Alvernon Way. It features eight examples of classical Japanese landscape design, a replica traditional Japanese cottage, a museum of Japanese art and handicrafts, an art gallery, and gift shop. It also holds seasonal Japanese festivals and classes in Japanese popular arts.

Taiko performance by Ken Koshio at Yume Japanese Gardens on January 8, 2022

“COMING: The ancient art of Taiko Drumming at Yume Japanese Gardens

Yume Japanese Gardens presents: KEN KOSHIO – A Taiko Drumming Performance on Saturday, January 8 from 3pm to 6pm.

Ken Koshio is a multi-faceted artist who specializes in Taiko, the ancient art form of Japanese drumming. He is also a Japanese folk artist, a singer and a songwriter. The mission of Ken Koshio is to resonate with all individuals and all things in the universe, using the rhythm of taiko to co-exist in the universe through the synergy of our human heartbeats.  He pursues a peaceful world while transcending borders through the healing power of ancient sounds and music.

Taiko has been a part of Japanese culture for many centuries, but as an ensemble Taiko performance appeared only in the ’50s.

Visitors to this unique performance will experience the heartbeat of the Earth!

The participation in this event will be scheduled in increments of 1 hour and half per time slot (3:00pm-4:30pm OR 4:30pm-6:00pm) to guarantee social distancing to our visitors. This is a limited admission event. Tickets cost: general admission $25 – members $18 – children 3-15 $10.

For more information, visit yumegardens.org or email Patricia Deridder at yume.gardens@gmail.com.”

Yume sets capacity limits to safeguard visitors and staff and observes Arizona Department of Health Services guidelines for COVID-19 management. Timed admission tickets, purchased online, are required for entry; physical distancing and facial coverings are also required, in all indoor and outdoor spaces.

#   #   #

Yume Japanese Gardens and Museum of Tucson (www.yumegardens.org) is a non-profit 501 (c)(3) organization, located at 2130 N. Alvernon Way. It features eight examples of classical Japanese landscape design, a replica traditional Japanese cottage, a museum of Japanese art and handicrafts, an art gallery, and gift shop. It also holds seasonal Japanese festivals and classes in Japanese popular arts.

Japanese New Year’s Shogatsu exhibit at Mini Time Machine Museum of Miniatures

Japanese Family Farmhouse & Kitchen exhibit ongoing to January 9, 2022 at Mini Time Machine Museum of Miniatures, 4455 E. Camp Lowell Drive

AKE-MASHITE-OMEDETOU-GOZAIMASU! (HAPPY NEW YEAR!)

“Shogatsu is a three day New Year celebration in Japan. Though most families get together on December 31st for New Years Eve, Shogatsu actually begins with the most important national holiday in Japan, Gantan (New Year’s Day) January 1st. The Japanese greeting “ake-mashite-omedetou-gozaimasu” is expressed to everyone you see the first time in the New Year.”

Holiday decorations are placed in and around the house beginning December 30thShimekazari is a traditional ornament hung over the front of the house to ward off evil spirits and welcome good luck. You will see bamboo and pine decorations tied with straw rope called kadomatsu at both sides of the entrance of houses set up to summon the New Year god Toshigami. It is believed that the god will bring good luck and prosperity in the New Year. The materials are symbolic- bamboo symbolizes strength and pine longevity. These decorations can be seen on the Japanese Family Farmhouse.

A special decoration called Kagami mochi is set out as an offering to Toshigami in the Japanese Kitchen. The decoration consists of two round mochi rice cakes of different size stacked (the smaller on top of the larger one) topped with a dadai (Japanese bitter orange). The Kagami mochi also symbolizes the continuity of the family; the mochi symbolize the past year and the year ahead and the dadai represents long life and the continuity of generations.

It is also a tradition to give children money during the Shogatsu holiday. Adults prepare small envelopes of money for the children called otoshidama. Look on the counter in the Japanese Kitchen for otoshidama. There is a custom of visiting a shrine or temple during the New Year’s holiday to pray for safety, health and good fortune.”

https://theminitimemachine.org/exhibitions/japanese-family-farmhouse-and-japanese-kitchen-shogatsu/

Tea ceremonies on December 4 at Yume Japanese Gardens

TEA CEREMONY

A Demonstration

Saturday, December 4, 2021 at 1:00 pm & 2:00 pm

The Japanese tea ceremony, or chanoyu (translated literally as “hot water for tea”), is a cherished ritual involving the preparation and presentation of powdered green tea in a highly stylized manner.

A host and a guest, wearing traditional Japanese kimono specific to the ceremony, will demonstrate how tea has been prepared, served, and enjoyed in Japan since the 12th century.

We advise that tea won’t be served to our audience due to Covid-19 restrictions.

General admission: $20 per person (includes Gardens admission).

Member admission: $5

Advanced ticket reservation is required.

This is a limited admission event to guarantee social distancing to our guests.

For tickets:
Buy tickets for Tea Ceremony at Yume Japanese Gardens at Yume Japanese Gardens of Tucson, Multiple dates and times (tickettailor.com)